Thursday, March 27, 2014

Quercus ilex - Holm - Evergreen Oak

General Information
Common Name Holm, Evergreen Oak
Scientific Name Quercus ilex
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height 20-27 m (66-89 ft)
Spread 10 -15 m (40 - 50 ft)
Growth Rate Fast
Bloom Time Spring
Color Green,
Flower Color Yellow
Type Tree
Native Europe, USA
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass Hamamelididae
Order/ Fagales
Family Fagaceae – Beech family
Genus Quercus L. – Oak
Species Q. ilex

Evergreen Oak
Quercus ilex common name is Holm also called Evergreen Oak. It is common evergreen Oak, was introduced during the sixteenth century from the Mediterranean. It is a moderate sized tree with a broad, rounded, dense crown and leaves which are usually almost oval and never lobed. The tree is common in gardens and parks, where it stands like a large holly, often drooping almost to the ground and casting a dense shade throughout the whole year.
The young shoots are grey-green, carrying small, downy winter buds. The oval or linear leaves, which are usually 1 – 2 inches long but vary greatly in size and shape, have a margin which is shallowly toothed or even without teeth, and although rather woolly in May, they become dark green and hairless on top but greyish- or yellowish-green underneath on account of the short, thick down.
The flowers of both sexes appear on the same tree in May. The grenish-yellow male catkins vary in length and are borne in abundance: the female flowers, of like color, have longish stalk. The acorn is short and at least half of it is enclosed in a downy cup; both are green at first, becoming dark brown when ripe (which takes two years).
The bark is grey, later becoming brown or nearly black, and divided into fairly small squares. The wood is hard, heavy, tough, and highly figured but rarely used.


The tree may not be attractive but often provides a useful screen and shelter from sun and wind. It is particularly useful by the sea because it gives shade and shelter and it resists the ill effects of salt laden winds and also atmospheric pollution in towns. 

Evergreen Oak

Evergreen Oak Young Plant

Evergreen Oak Leaves

Evergreen Oak Leaves

Evergreen Oak Flowers

Evergreen Oak Fruits

Evergreen Oak Ripe Fruits 

Evergreen Oak Bark

Evergreen Oak Ornamental 


Evergreen Oak 

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Quercus cerris - Turkey Oak

General Information
Common Name Turkey Oak
Scientific Name Quercus cerris
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height 25-40 m (90-150 ft)
Spread 10 -15 m (40 - 50 ft)
Growth Rate Fast
Bloom Time Late Spring
Color Green, Red
Flower Color Yellow
Type Tree
Native Europe, USA
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass Hamamelididae
Order/ Fagales
Family Fagaceae – Beech family
Genus Quercus L. – Oak
Species Q. cerris

Quercus cerris - Turkey Oak
Quercus cerris common name is Turkey Oak also called European Turkey Oak is a wide-crowned tree with ascending lanky limbs and branches, deeply lobed leaves, mossy-cupped acorns and curious bark.
The twigs are brown, with a knobbly look and carry spiral, alternate, brown winter buds which are small and downy, almost hidden by the long persistent stipules. The leaves vary in size and in their deep and saw-tooth-like lobes. Their upper surface is dull green, the lower much paler in color. They persist on the trees later than those on European native oaks. This is Deciduous tree.
The flowers of both sexes appear on the same tree in May. The long pendent tassel-like male catkins are greenish-yellow, so too are the short-stalked female flowers. The acorn, with its mossy-covered, rather shallow cup, takes two years in which to ripen.
The bark is rough, dark grey and fissured. A distinct swelling occurs both at the junction of the ascending branches with the trunk, and on the twigs. The wood, though heavy, is prone to warping and shrinkage; few merchants will purchase it, thus reducing its use to little but firewood. This inferiority is unfortunate, because the tree grows faster and straighter than all European other hardwoods except poplar, willow and ash.
In 1765 a remarkable hybrid between Turkey Oak and the Cork Oak, Q. suber L., was raised by an Exeter nurseryman named Lucombe. This Lucombe Oak, Q. ´ hispanica ‘Lucombeana’, forms a magnificent park tree, with leaves like the Turkey Oak but dark green above and also more or less evergreen, some have a grey, corky bark.



Quercus cerris - Turkey Oak

Quercus cerris - Turkey Oak : Young Plant

Quercus cerris - Turkey Oak

Quercus cerris - European Turkey Oak : Leaves

European Turkey Oak : Flowers

European Turkey Oak : Fruits

European Turkey Oak : Fruits

European Turkey Oak : Rep Fruits

European Turkey Oak : Bark

European Turkey Oak : Log

European Turkey Oak : In Autumn

European Turkey Oak : Full Tree

European Turkey Oak

European Turkey Oak : Oak Pod

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Prunus simonii - Simon plum


General Information
Common Name Simon Plum
Scientific Name Prunus simonii
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height 5 - 8.5 m (18 - 30 ft)
Spread 4.5 -6 m (15 - 20 ft)
Growth Rate Fast
Bloom Time Early Summer
Color Green
Flower Color White
Type Tree
Native China
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass Rosidae
Order Rosales
Family Rosaceae – Rose family
Genus Prunus L. – plum
Species P. simoni

Prunus simonii, common name is Apricot Plum also known as Simon Plum, is a tree in the genus Prunus. It has been important for breeding commercial plum cultivars from crosses with other species of the genus Prunus. It is widely and commercially cultivate in china. This species is cultivated for its edible fruit and has many cultivars.
 Prunus simonii is a small deciduous tree. The green, simple leaves are alternate. They are obviating, crenate and etiolate. It is growing to about 5 – 8.5 meters (18 - 30 ft) in height. It produces cluster of white five-satellite flowers in Spring. The flowers produce almost no pollen. 
The fruit varies in quality, can be bitter or pleasant to eat, and is flat in shape. Just like an apricot, the fruit flesh clings tightly to the pit. The taste is often bitter. Fruit production is not particularly bountiful. The fruit is dark red or "brick red". The branches are slender and the leaves oblong. In appearance, the fruit is flatter than most plums, looking "tomato-like". The fruit is especially aromatic, much more so than Prunus salicina, with a relatively high level of hexyl acetate, which gives apples their aroma. The drupe fruits ripe in summer.