Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

General Information
Common Name Deodar Cedar
Scientific Name Cedrus deodara
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height 40 - 50  m (131 - 164 ft)
Spread 15 -20 m (50 - 66 ft)
Growth Rate Fast
Bloom Time Spring
Color Green,
Flower Color Green
Type Tree
Native Africa, Asia, Europe.
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Coniferophyta – Conifers
Class Pinopsida
Subclass 
Order Pinales
Family Pinaceae – Pine family
Genus Cedrus Carr. –  Cedar
Species C. deodara

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar
Cedrus deodara commonly known as Deodar Cedar also known as Himalayan cedar. It is native to Western Himalaya, India. It is a large growing evergreen tree that grows 40–50 m (131–164 ft) in height sometime grows up to 60 m (197 ft) with a trunk up to 3 m (10 ft) in diameter.
The Deodar Cedar Differs principally from the Atlas Cedar in having a flexible, pendulous leader; and differs from both the Atlas and the Lebanon Cedar in having longer needles, pendulous tips to the branches and larger barrel-shaped cones. Furthermore, it is a relatively taller, more graceful and erect tree than either of the other cedars. The tree is a native of the western Himalayan ranges of India, and was introduced to Britain in 1831 and 1841.
The trees are conical when young, later developing massive trunks and large often spreading branches. The branchlets are of two kinds: the long terminal gracefully drooping growth shoots with needles scattered around them (‘juvenile’ foliage), and short spur growths with needles in rosettes.
The young needles are yellowish. The mature needles are from 1-2 inches in length, and a soft shade of green.
Both sexes of flowers are usually found on different branches of the same tree, though whole trees may be of one sex. The male catkins are long and erect, dull greyish-green with a purplish bloom, liberating bright yellow pollen in autumn. The females are small, greenish, erect conelets. The resultant erect resinous barrel-shaped green cones, up to 5 inches long, do not reach full size until after two years, when they turn brown and ripen within a few months. They then gradually break up to release their winged seeds, the central spike of the cone alone remaining.
Like as the Atlas Cedar, at first the bark is smooth and grey, but with age becomes brown, furrowed and scaly. The wood has a narrow whitish sapwood and a mid-brown heartwood, and is fairly hard, fragrant, naturally durable, and will work to a fine finish. It is scarce, hence little used commercially.

It is also use as Medicine. The inward wood is sweet-smelling and used to make incense. Inward wood is refined into key oil. As bugs stay away from this tree, the fundamental oil is utilized as creepy crawly repellent on the feet of steeds, dairy cattle and camels. It likewise has hostile to parasitic properties and has some potential for control of contagious disintegration of flavors amid capacity. The external bark and stem are astringent.


Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

Young Plants of Deodar Cedar

Leaves of Deodar Cedar

Deodar Cedar Leaves

Male catkins of  Deodar Cedar

 Deodar Cedar male catkins

Male catkins of Deodar Cedar

Deodar Cedar male catkins

Female Cone of Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar Female Cone

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar Female Cone

Bark of Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara  Trunk

 Deodar Cedar as ornamental plant

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar
Video of Deodar Cedar:

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

General Information
Common Name Atlas Cedar
Scientific Name Cedrus atlantica
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height 30 - 35  m (100 - 118 ft)
Spread 15 -20 m (50 - 66 ft)
Growth Rate Fast
Bloom Time Spring
Color Green,
Flower Color Yellow
Type Tree
Native Africa, Asia, Europe.
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Coniferophyta – Conifers
Class Pinopsida
Subclass 
Order Pinales
Family Pinaceae – Pine family
Genus Cedrus Carr. –  Cedar
Species C. atlantica

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar
Cedrus atlantica commonly known as Atlas Cedar. The tree’s native habitat is on the mountains of Algeria and Morocco. It is a large growing evergreen tree that grows 30-35 m (100 – 118 ft) in height with a trunk diameter of 1.5–2 m (5-7 ft). Sometime it grows up to 40 m (131 ft) in height.
The Atlas Cedar differs principally from other Cedars in having an erect leader and ascending ends to the branches. Furthermore, it has a blue-green foliage, and may even be grey; and the cones are usually more numerous and rather smaller and less barrel-shaped.
The trees are conical when young, later developing massive trunks and large, ascending branches. The branch-lets are of two kinds; the long terminal growth shoots with needles scattered around them (‘juvenile’ foliage), and short spur growths with needles in rosettes. The mature needles are about an inch in length, and slightly bluish-green.
Both sexes of flowers are usually found on different branches of the same tree. The male catkins, in regimented rows, are long and erect, dull greyish-green with a purplish bloom, liberating bright yellow pollen in autumn. The females are small, greenish, erect cone-lets, and the resultant erect resinous barrel-shaped green cones do not reach full size until after two years, when they turn brown and ripen within a few months. They then gradually break up, releasing their winged seeds, the central spike of the cne alone remaining.
At first the bark is smooth and grey, but with age becomes brown, furrowed and scaly. The wood has a narrow whitish sapwood and a mid-brown heartwood, and is fairly hard, fragrant, naturally durable, and will work to a fine finish. It is scarce, hence little used commercially.
The variety glauca, a blue form in cultivating, has very pleasing blue or glaucous needles. In its most richly colored form it is one of the most effective of all conifers, but the glaucous tint is an unstable character. It is common in cultivation as an ornamental tree in temperate climates. In garden settings, often the glaucous forms are planted as ornamental trees. There are also fastigiated, pendulous, and golden-leaf forms in cultivation. The Atlas cedar is useful in cultivation because it is more tolerant of dry and hot conditions than most conifers. It was introduced to Britain in 1845 by Lord Somers of Eastnor in Herefordshire. An Atlas cedar is planted at the White House South Lawn in Washington, DC. President Carter ordered a tree house built within the cedar for his daughter Amy.


Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Leaves of Atlas Cedar

Atlas Cedar Leaves

Male Cones of Atlas Cedar

 Atlas Cedar Male Cones

Male Cones of Cedrus atlantica 

Cedrus atlantica Male Cones

Female Cone of Atlas Cedar

Atlas Cedar Female Cones

Female Cone of Cedrus atlantica

Cedrus atlantica Female Cones

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar Female Cones

Bark of Atlas Cedar

Atlas Cedar Young Plant

Cedrus atlantica Young Plants

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica - Atlas Cedar