Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Crataegus monogyna – Oneseed Hawthorn – May


General Information
Common Name Oneseed Hawthorn, May
Scientific Name Crataegus monogyna
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height  6-14 m (20–45 ft)
Spread 2.4-3 m (8-10 ft)
Growth Rate Slow
Bloom Time Spring
Color Green
Flower Color White
Type Shrub Tree
Native Europe, western Asia
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass Rosidae
Order Rosales
Family Rosaceae – Rose family
Genus Crataegus L. – hawthorn
Species C. monogyna

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree
Hawthorn scientific name is Crataegus monogyna is a small tree, usually bushy shrubs with a spreading or rounded crown of spiny intertwining branches and twigs, is a traditional component of hedgerows and thus forms so much a part of the European landscape. It is often called white thorn or ‘quick’ – the old word for living, because it contrasted with the dead material used in earlier hedges and fences.
The zigzag shoots, except for some vigorous first-year ones, are armed with numerous short spines. Along the shoots, which are dull red above and green below, are set alternately very small reddish-black winter buds with many scales. The small dull green leaves are variable in size and shape with three to seven lobes usually cut more than half way towards the midrib. The margins of the lobes are either undivided or bear a few teeth towards their apex. The stipules, large on vigorous shoots, soon fall.
Each inflorescence comprises up to about fifteen heavily scented bi-sexual flowers, with petals which are usually white but occasionally pink. The tree begins to bloom properly in May, hence its common alternative name is ‘May’. The small round fruit ( the ‘haw’) changes in early September from green to scarlet. It retains the withered style from the flower, and there is very rarely more than one nutlet within the fleshy edible coat.
When young the bark is smooth and greenish-grey or greenish-brown. Gradually it becomes a darker grey and gets rather rugged. It is often strongly fluted. The sapwood is white, and the heartwood a rust-brown. Being small in size, the timber is not of much account but it was once favored for wood-engravers’ blocks, mallet-heads and tool handles.


Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree : Leaves

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree : Full Blooms

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree : Flowers

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree : Flowers

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree : Flowers

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree : Green Fruits

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree : Rep Fruits

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree

Crataegus monogyna – Hawthorn – May Tree

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